Let’s talk about writer’s block

It’s 2:33 am, and I have not done one stitch of writing all day.  No, I do not have writer’s block, I have been busy with life, and I suppose that I have been procrastinating a little bit.  Before you assume that I have writer’s block, let me assure you that my delay or putting off my writing is more related to fatigue than anything else.

Let’s talk about writer’s block for a minute.  It’s the dread of all writers… Picture it… you are in the middle of a fabulous adverb or adjective-driven paragraph, that promises to intoxicate the reader with clarity and description, when suddenly you have nowhere else to go!  Initially, there is a pause, then your right hand goes off the mouse, and you lean into the screen (left elbow on the desk), and you begin to tap the desk with your right hand (as if tapping and leaning is going to make any difference).  After about 10 minutes of this,  you lean back in your comfortable office-type chair, stretch, yawn, and rise from your  perch.  You make your way into the kitchen, and consider your options.  You could embark on a glass of pinot noir, but that is only going to relax you, and you need to be stimulated, so you decide on hot chai tea.  As the kettle is getting hot, you wander into the  bathroom, attend to the call of nature, and decide that a bubble bath might be in order.  You hear the whistle blowing, and run back to the kitchen half naked to fix your tea.  With tea in hand, you go back to the bathroom to enjoy a moment of reprieve and relaxation, with the hope  of stimulating your mind.  You tell yourself, “I just need to take a break, and then I will be right back in the zone.” Of course, you have only been writing for about an hour and a half,  so why  a break is necessary is a bit of a mystery, but it’s a worthy excuse.

It is like having a fine spa moment–You are up to your neck in bubbles wearing a green mud mask with cucumbers on your eyes.  The candles are lit while Sinatra’s standards play in the background.  Before turning into a prune, you decide to get out of the bath. Somewhere between the bathtub and getting dressed is your problem, because  you decide that you might better function in the morning.  After all– It is 3:15 am.

You know something has to shift when you lie in bed having conversations with your characters and begin to role-play with them.  It doesn’t take long before you realize that you really did need that glass of pinto noir!  Just before nodding off, you tell yourself that this is not writer’s block, but a part of character development, and that tomorrow will be much more productive day.

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6 Comments

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6 responses to “Let’s talk about writer’s block

  1. Oh, those three a.m. conversations… for me it’s usually four a.m. and by the time the ideas and thoughts go through my mind I end up nodding back to sleep a couple of hours later telling myself I should have just gotten up and gone to the puter to write. I find writer’s block to merely be procrastination. When I wrote for Today.com and had to write on a daily basis, I was never short ideas. It’s just a matter of discipline.

  2. I was going to leave a comment, but suddenly I got blocked and wandered off to do something else. LOL! Actually, all kidding aside, great post! The part of the post the grabs me the most is your mention of procrastination. I must admit that’s a huge issue with me. It’s hard to be disciplined when no one is looking over your shoulder making sure your work is done.

    Great post!

    • LOL perhaps this is another facet of writer’s block that I should cover? Wandering off during a writing project! Hahaha!

    • Procrastination is a horrible habit. One that I have battled all of my life, truthfully. Discipline however is something I do try and embrace for the most part… The socializing online is always “yet another” distraction that I probably don’t need, but it is all so amusing! 🙂

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